Selection of press quotes:

Samoreau album review, Guitar Traditions by George W. Harris, 08/06/2017
Violinist Daniel Weltlinger composes and plays new material in the tradition of Django Reinhardt, but with a look to the future.
Read More >

Samoreau album review, Sydney Morning Herald by John Shand, 23/04/2017
This album is often so swollen with beauty it is like time-lapse photography of tulips blooming.
Read More >

Samoreau album review, Music Trust Online by Peter Winkler, 02/04/2017
It is no surprise that Daniel Weltlinger’s highly developed musicianship and beautifully warm violin tone are now in demand in international projects at the highest level.
Read More >

Samoreau album review, Hooked On Music by Michael Koenig, 30/06/2017
Daniel Weltlinger und seine hochkarätigen musikalischen Begleiter machen “Samoreau – A Tribute To The Fans Of Django Reinhardt“ zu einem dem Gedenken Django Reinhardts würdigen Stück Klangkunst, das lange nachhallt.
Read More >

Koblenz album review, Jazz Manouche News by Bertino Rodman, 06/03/2015
The CD creates a very homogenous image when listening to it, and that is what it is mentioned for. There is a wide spectrum starting from Cajun- inspired Elements passing to Valse Musettes, songs influenced by typical Sintimusic up to straight foreward swinging tunes like “Louis” (Hommage to Louis Armstrong) or “Stephane” (composed for Grapelli). The musical journey ends in the song “Koblenz” recorded with Lulo Reinhardt in Koblenz.
Read More >

Koblenz album review, Sydney Morning Herald by John Shand, 21/12/2014
The music of Reinhardt and violinist Stephane Grappelli has spawned countless imitators and revivalists the world over but where others have used the Gypsy swing idiom as a vehicle for virtuosity, Weltlinger brings a refreshing sense of innocence to bear. The violinist imbues the melodies and his sound with a lightness and joyousness that can coexist with any sadness or pensiveness implicit in a given piece.
Read More >

The Four Questions album review, Gapplegate Guitar & Bass Blog by Grego Applegate Edwards, 13/02/2013
Anyone who finds traditional Jewish and modern improvisational strains a welcome mix will no doubt feel as I do after listening a few times. I do not doubt. And if you have no idea what such a combination could be like, get a copy and experiment. It’s good for you!
Read More >

The Four Questions album review, Jazz Weekly by George W. Harris, 27/12/2012
The music itself mixes exotic moods that will remind you of nights on the Mediterranean coast (“Kohanim”) but the band can also play a few tricks on you as well. A song like “Hallel” may start out as a traditional Freilach, but before you can say “Mazel Tov” the song turns into a burning little jazz piece. The dramatic mood swings on “Ma Nishtana” delivers some impressive bass work, while the pensive “Hine Ma Tov” is as somber as a Shabbat Candle Prayer. Impressive on a musical, cultural and religious level.
Read More >

The Four Questions album review, FAME review by Mark S. Tucker, 09/10/2012
The Four Questons is in fact the most progressive application of distinctly Yiddish style I’ve ever heard, yet, while spinning the ancient mode out to its farthest reaches, they also manage to preserve its essence and, in doing so, pay lavish tribute to the genius underlying.
Read More >